Biting

Do you like horses? Horses are strong and beautiful. I’m not a good horse woman. I don’t ride well and haven’t had good encounters with them. Don’t get me wrong, I like them but they don’t seem to like me. I had a bad experience with a horse which was supposed to be gentle and tame. Our story is about a horse with a similar problem.

Blaze is a strong, gentle, and calm male horse. But when he was a colt and as he grew older, he was very different. Blaze used to be mean and angry but he learned the hard way to be gentle and calm.

The pasture is long and wide, filled with juicy tasting grass and flowers. In the middle runs a stream that's partially dammed up creating a pond. The horses love their home on the Miller’s ranch. Each day they are given oats in the morning and night and put out in the pasture to graze the day away. An adult horse needs around 20lbs of food and about 12 gallons of water a day.

Blaze was born beautiful and strong with a white stripe down his nose. He held his head high and proud. As a colt, Blaze was full of energy and spunk. He flew through the pasture kicking up his hooves.

Blaze had a problem; He didn’t get along with the other horses, colts, or fillies. If another horse was in his way, or eating where he wanted to eat, he bit at them. Biting became a terrible habit.

One time a colt splashed in the pond next to Blaze.

“What are you doing? You got water all over me!” Blaze said.

“I’m playing. Come on in, it’s fun!” Anchor said.

Without another word, Blaze stretched his neck and bit Anchor on the tail.

“Aaaah! That hurt! Why did you bite me?”

“You splashed me. Now go somewhere else to play!” Blaze yelled.

Anchor splashed away leaving Blaze alone. Blaze continued drinking.

Blaze’s mom galloped over. “I heard you bit Anchor.”

“Yep.”

“Why did you bite him?”

“He splashed me. I didn’t like it.”

“Did you ask him to stop? Or did you just bite him?”

“Bit him.”

“Biting is not a nice thing to do. If a horse or any animal bothers you, ask them to stop. If they don’t—just walk away,” his mom said.

Blaze didn’t say anymore but went back to chomping on grass. His mom hoped he would think about it and left him alone.

That night Blaze was in his stall when one of the grooms brought him his oats. The groom put a scoop of oats in his trough.

Blaze wanted more. “Neigh,” Blaze whinnied.

“Hungry tonight, okay a little bit more. Here you go,” said the groom as he filled the scoop and shook out a little into Blaze’s trough.

Blaze wasn't satisfied with the amount and tried to bite the groom.

The groom jumped back saying, “Whoa, boy. I hope that was a love nip and not a bite.”

A few days later, Blaze got saddled for a young woman. She was pretty and light as a feather. She was one of his favorites and enjoyed taking her for rides. He hoped they took the trail up the hill where a waterfall fell into a pool. It was cool and lovely up there and he liked the sweet water. Instead, she directed him away in the opposite direction.

He got angry and reached his head around and opened his mouth ready to bite her leg.

All at once, he felt the sting of a gloved hand on his neck. The young woman screeched, “What do you think you are doing?”

Blaze lowered his head. She jumped off and called the groom. Blaze was taken to his stall. No one took him out into the beautiful pasture that day. Instead of fresh cool grass to eat, he was given hay.

The next day the other horses ignored Blaze and when it came time to sleep, he was left standing. He didn’t get his turn sleeping on the ground. Horses can sleep standing up but lying down they get the best deep sleep. Horses take turns staying alert for danger and only one or a few lie down at a time.

For weeks, he wasn’t saddled or touched by the groom and was ignored by the other horses. Blaze felt the exclusion and loneliness. He didn’t like being alone. He missed the horses and people. The groom didn't talk or touch him. He thought about what had led to this. His anger and biting had gotten him here. He decided right then to be nice and not bite.

Blaze galloped up to the horses. “I’m sorry I’ve been mean and bit at you. I want to be your friend and hang out with you.”

“We will give you a second chance.” said one of the older horses.

Blaze and the other horses got along wonderfully, playing, sleeping, and eating together. They enjoyed each other’s company. One thing bothered him—he didn’t know how to tell the people he was sorry.

The groom continued to be cautious around him. Blaze kept trying to get people to understand he was changed. He stood still and gave the groom room, and then he nodded his head. Each day, the groom didn’t act as wary of Blaze. After a week of Blaze's calm conduct, the groom rubbed his nose. Blazed loved the long awaited touch. Soon, the groom took him out to the paddock, saddled him, and mounted. They trotted around the paddock a few times.
Blaze became one of the Miller’s favorite horses to ride. He learned that biting is not being kind. People and horses don’t want to be around another who bites.

Memorize one or both of these verses: Proverbs 14:17 A quick-tempered man acts foolishly, and a man of wicked intentions is hated.

Ecclesiastes 7:9 Do not hasten in your spirit to be angry, for anger rests in the bosom of fools.

Verses in NKJV unless otherwise stated.

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